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Money = Broccoli

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A few months ago, I read an article from Entrepreneur that is still sticking with me. There was a specific tip that really changed my perspective on my finances.

Know that making money is like making broccoli.

 

Money = Broccoli?! Yup!

So basically, instead of getting hung up on money — treat it like you would the food in your fridge. Use what you have, you can always get more.

Money in general can be very scary. For me, parting with my money is a struggle sometimes. I like the security of seeing all those dollars saved up for when “just in case” happens. While that is a great mentality to have, I sometimes miss out on a lot as well. (Still kicking myself for not splurging on the Katy Perry concert tickets.)

I love the idea of knocking down the power of money and turning it into a vegetable! Long ago, vegetables were more valuable than a piece of metal or paper anyways – check out Deepak’s similar thoughts on money and wealth.

I believe the way for me to get past the fear is to build realistic goals for the future that are aligned with my core values. I can do that by asking myself if what I want to do with my money provides growth for me, my family, my business, etc. Those goals can be reflected in my financial budgeting plan so I can easily identify if I am making a beneficial investment, while still being mindful of my money.

We have been talking financials and work all week in the Review Reflect Relaunch 2016 Program and learning bunches. As we paused to capture what happened over the past year, this is what has come up:

  • It seems easier to ignore finances than deal with them
  • Facing how we interact with our finances is actually empowering – not scary!
  • Our relationships between work and money are closely tied together
  • It is important to remember that the value of our work is defined by much more than money
  • Mindful investments – whether monetary or other types – contribute most to our growth

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How do you interact with your money?

Not sure what your money story is? Check out this link or this money personality link.

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#RelaunchMy2016

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We are five days into the new year. How are your plans going for 2016?!

I feel very ready to relaunch into my year, yet my mind seems to be in slow motion. Possibly from my lingering head cold or not getting enough sleep? Or it could be that I still have not completed my year-end review – Oops! I have been so busy conducting reviews for everyone else and preparing for my  year-in-review workshops…. I am not practicing what I preach.

I have been taking little steps to gear up for the new year – researching new doctors, finding strength exercises, creating a business budget, scheduling calls with social media consultant, etc. But the one thing I know is hanging me up – I haven’t looked back to 2015 to really accept what happened. It is all still replaying in my brain – over and over and over again.

So I am putting it out there. I will conduct my year-end review by the end of this week. Someone please hold me accountable to this!

In the meantime, I would love to hear how all of you plan to relaunch your life this year. Leave a comment below or post in the #RelaunchMy2016 contest happening over on Instagram – share what you need to relaunch and you could win a FREE registration to the Review Reflect Relaunch Online Program which starts next Tuesday.

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Interested in participating in a visual review of your past year? I offer individual sessionsbusiness review workshops and a new interactive online program to review 2015.

Sign up for the Passionate Do-Gooder e-newsletter to receive special promotions and tips.

 

Value of Looking Back

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Recently, I was asked to participate in an interview about year-end reviews. One of the questions asked was why is a year end-review so important. Although, I am a huge proponent of conducting yearly reviews, I often skip over the explanation of why a review is important and assume others already know. I do recall my skepticism of reviews long ago though, so I am sharing my thoughts on why you should take the time to complete a review of your past year and how you can get started.

The close of a year seems to be a natural reset for many of us. Our year ends with a celebration of the past and a mindset to welcome in a fresh start. We tend to move so quickly through daily life sometimes we don’t slow down to realize what is actually happening in the present moment. A review allows us to capture what we may have forgotten, whether intentional or not.

I believe much of our growth is formed from a combination of our actual experiences and the acceptance of those experiences. When we pause to acknowledge what occurred in the past (good or bad) we are really letting go and making room for new experiences, connections and opportunities in the future.

Year-end reviews are as much about planning for the future as they are reflecting on the past. When we know what we want to do, we feel in control of our life and ultimately we can make better choices because of it. There is less of a chance you will feel indecisive or stuck if you already know the direction you want to go in.

Although, I find Visual Reviews to be most effective – because of the accountability, guidance and of course the visual maps – the important thing is that you give yourself the space to review and learn so you can plan for future growth.

Here are some tips if you want to conduct your own year-end review:

  1. Collect reference materials. If you haven’t given your year much thought yet, you probably have forgotten what you actually did. Start by reviewing your calendars (electronic or paper) which hopefully has meetings, appointments, and events captured. If you use social media, many create a mini review of the year for you around this time – reference these to help trigger your memory.
  1. Document Chronologically. Once you have the reference materials handy, start documenting what happened. The easiest way is to move through the calendar from January to December. Write down appointments, events and milestones for each month.
  1. Find a lesson. Documenting your year is only the first step in the process. Once you know what happened, think about the successes and challenges faced during each month. Note how you feel and what you learned from each.
  1. Create a Plan. The lessons your learned hopefully helped to identify some things you want to do again and others you want to steer clear of. Start creating a plan for your new year with actions you can take to keep doing what worked and to stop what didn’t work for you.

Wishing you a Happy New Year full of Clarity, Control and Direction!

Interested in participating in a visual review of your past year? I offer individual sessions, business review workshops and a new interactive online program to review 2015.

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Interested in receiving special promotions and tips. Sign up for the Passionate Do-Gooder e-newsletter.

Flip It

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Our brains are so tricky some times. They play games and place limitations on so many things. Recently, I have experienced some brain games myself.

Last month I had an idea pop up that I could maybe offer workshops to guide others through a year-end review. The idea had promise even though it was totally out of my comfort zone, so of course my brain stepped in and immediately listed the reasons why I couldn’t do it. And I listened to those I CAN’Ts!

The thought of trying something new can be super scary. It seems much easier to list all the reasons why we should just do what is safe, but stepping outside of our comfort zone helps us to thrive and learn from the experiences.

Luckily, I knew the brain game well so as the idea kept coming back to me I decided to Flip It. Instead of focusing on all those I CAN’Ts, I found a reason to counter it and said I CAN!

For example:

I CAN’T because…I never did anything like this before –> I CAN because I know the content and just need to tweak the delivery

I CAN’T because…No one will sign up –> I CAN because I will promote the benefits to the right audience so they understand the value

I CAN’T because….It might suck –> I CAN because it just might succeed and I will put all my efforts into it so it can’t possibly suck

Sure I still feel some fear, but I keep going because with every new participant that signs up I feel more excitement and confidence that I CAN do this!

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What CAN’Ts are blocking you from moving forward?

How can you flip it to I CAN?

Try out this free template to help you. 

Check out my new workshops too!

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Expanding Perspectives

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Recently, I had a discussion with my daughter about additive and subtractive art techniques. Additive art, meaning to begin with a type of blank canvas then add materials, such as paint, to create. Subtractive art is created in reverse by starting with a material, such as a wood block, and removing parts. She commented on the difficulty level and amount of time needed to break down the steps for a subtractive art project. It was a different way of drawing than she was accustomed to, but it expanded her perspective on how she could create art.

Those same principles can be applied in life, not just in art. When faced with challenges, we may be accustomed to adding “more” as a solution, but it is quite possible the best answer might require subtracting something. Other times, we might need to look at what is missing and add to it.

We can not solve our problems with the same level of thinking that created them. – Albert Einstein

Even on a simple day-to-day level, we can practice expanding our perspectives by stopping to think first before passing judgment and acting. For example, a few days ago a person driving behind me was repeatedly beeping his horn for me to turn at a red light while I was waiting for traffic to clear. I first thought he was a super impatient road-raging maniac, but then I thought maybe he could be late to a very important meeting like a job interview that he desperately needed or he could have even been testing out his new horn (not likely, but possible). Although, I was very annoyed at first, I tried to think of what he was seeing or experiencing and let the annoyance pass as I continued driving to my destination. We never know the whole story, and it is possible that from his angle he could not see the line of cars coming down from the adjacent hill. Maybe he could have thought that first, before (over)reacting.

I hear the idea of expanding perspectives in corporate speak often. It is in phrases like – looking at the big picture, taking a high level view, conducting 360 reviews and taking a systems thinking approach. However it is described, businesses recognize that looking at all the information in a different way, finding patterns and determining how things are impacted is key to thinking strategically and making better decisions.

Just as we grow with new experiences, our perspectives should widen to understand people or concepts just a little more each day too.

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Is there a certain topic you are very passionate about?

You don’t necessarily need to agree with it, but try to understand an opposing view.

Have you run across a problem you can’t solve? Maybe try a different approach than you are used to.

Check out some additive art here and here.
And subtractive art here, here, and here.


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Hey Pittsburgh-ers!
Register for the Review Reflect Relaunch Workshop on December 15th.

Feel proud of this year’s work, confident you are moving in the right direction and in control of your future plans for your business with a completed visual story map for 2016.


Interested in receiving updates about how you can become
a Passionate Do-Gooder. Sign up for the e-newsletter.